Gadsden-Pacific Division Toy Train Operating Museum Logo

GADSDEN-PACIFIC DIVISION
 TOY TRAIN OPERATING MUSEUM

Tucson, Arizona
 

A CHARITABLE, NON-PROFIT IRS 501(C)(3) ORGANIZATION
 DEDICATED TO THE HOBBY OF MODEL RAILROADING
 BY PROVIDING THE PUBLIC WITH
 AN INTERACTIVE MUSEUM OF OPERATING TOY TRAIN LAYOUTS AND DISPLAYS.

Toy Train Museum Tunnel


 

Toy Train Museum Tunnel

 


 

Large Scale Railroad
Construction Progress 2018

Help Wanted

Work sessions are on Saturday mornings usually around 7:30am.
Come down and help build a railroad!

For more information, or to volunteer, contact Burt Wright (cell #) 444-0661

[Large Scale Railroad info...] 


Planned for May 19, 2018

There will be a scheduled work session this Saturday at 7:30 am at the Museum. On the work agenda will be the preparation work on the turntable structure recently delivered to the Museum. It is currently located on top of the steaming bay next to the loading zone. Preparation work will involve wire brushing and/or grinding off surface rust and then priming the areas with rust preventative primer. While that is occurring, the 2 X 6 planking needs to be cut to length, pre-drilled for the mounting bolts, and then coated with wood preservative. If we can complete these tasks, we can brush on a coat of flat black Rustoleum paint that we have. So, you might notice that there is NO “digging” indicated for this work session so everyone can get involved.

Last weekend was a total bust as far as the 7-1/2” gauge committee was concerned. There were only two members present Saturday morning – so we decided to blow off the move of the turntable from Burt’s house to the Museum. Sunday wasn’t much better as we didn’t have enough crew to man the train at the Open House, so the train never came out of the barn. Even though it was Mother’s Day, the Open House was well attended by the Public.

Midmorning Sunday, before the Open House began, Glenn Ellis met Burt Wright at his home and together they were able to slide the turntable structure off the welding table into his trailer.

The turntable was then delivered to the Museum where, using Big Joe, they were able to slide the turntable off of Glenn’s trailer, across Big Joe, and onto the steaming bay. No lifting was necessary which is a good thing – the turntable weighs in about 300#.

Look forward to seeing all of you this weekend.


May 12, 2018

There will not be a scheduled work session Saturday as this Sunday is a scheduled Open House. Having said that, and assuming that all the welding gets completed on the turntable, it could get delivered to the Museum by Saturday morning in preparation for its installation. Prior to installing, there have been suggestions that we first paint the turntable. If it is to be painted, now is definitely the time to do that. Thus, on Saturday, we could begin preparing the surfaces on the turntable for paint application. That may involve grinding, wire brushing, and/or sanding. Color choice has not been made but flat black is currently in 1st place. Input is always encouraged. In addition, we will need to apply weather resistant stain to the wood planking that will be installed on the side of the turntable. So, although there is no “scheduled” work session, there is always work that happens at the Museum. Come on down and enjoy the camaraderie. I guarantee – NO DIGGING!

Current weather forecasts show that the high temperature for Sunday could again be over 90 degrees again. 90 degrees has been our cut-off to operate the train outside. The decision to run will probably be made on Open House day as it’s too early now to declare it as a GO/NO-GO. All members are encouraged to come to the Museum as even if we don’t run, we always need help inside the Museum.

Last weekend, only a couple of the 7-1/2” group came to the scheduled work session. Thus, we were only able to get the hole dug for the center pivot foundation. No pictures of that excavation were taken – it looks like any other hole in the ground. It only took about an hour to get the hole dug and yes, we did encounter a bunch of caliche. We took the opportunity of finishing early to go over to Superlite Block Co. (previously Young Block) around the corner from the Museum. What we found was an interesting style of cap block that was slightly wedge shaped that could have application as a finish to the outside of the concrete ring. Jurgen Zander developed a drawing shown below showing how such block could be installed. We will have more discussion about this concept during future work sessions. Your input is always appreciated.

UPDATE from last weekend: With Jacob Payne’s welding skill not to mention his welding equipment and that awesome welding table, the welding on the turntable structure was pretty much completed. Still needed are mounts for a push bar on at least one end (probably removable to facilitate moving the assembly) plus mounting supports for “wooden sideboard planking”. In addition, linkage for the locking mechanism to secure the turntable in alignment needs to be added.

In the picture below, the turntable is on its side with the top of the turntable facing right – the notches cut into the top of the cross members will allow for the wheel flanges. The mounts for the rollers extend out 6” from the edge of the channel iron. That makes the entire assembly 22-5/8” wide at each end. Otherwise, the table is only 10-5/8” wide (7-5/8” gauge width plus two 1-1/2” wide pieces of channel iron). The wood side board planks will be installed between the mounts for the rollers with the outer edge of the planks even with the roller mounts. With a 14” wide locomotive on the turntable, the wood side board planks would extend a little more than 4-1/4” out from the side of the locomotive. We plan to use a standard width 2 x 6 (5½” wide) with a ½” space between the 2 x 6 and the channel iron. I figure the supports could be 1-1/2” angle welded to the side of the channel iron located so the planking would be level with the top of the turntable. The boards would be secured to the angle iron with carriage bolts. We would stain the boards with water-resistant stain like we used on the engine house. What do you think?

Below is a picture of one of the MLS turntables (they have more than one). It has wider planks that appear to be 2 x 10’s or 12’s), but the added width doesn’t appear to add any particular benefit functionally speaking (actually the additional width could be counterproductive in our application since our turntable will be installed closer to the ground. The yellow handle on the right of the MLS turntable is the locking mechanism used to secure the table in place when it’s being used to load a train. As I recall, there was only one of these locking mechanism’s on the table. It is our intent to have only 1 locking mechanism initially although a 2nd one could be added later if we felt it was necessary.

On the MLS turntable, the roller wheels were mounted below the bottom of the turntable as shown in the photo below. Our rollers are installed into pockets attached to the side of the turntable. The height difference is about 4” with the result being that our turntable will be much lower to the ground. The addition height of the MLS turntable resulted in them having to create a deeper well which required them to have a concrete retaining wall poured entirely around their turntable to compensate for the added depth. We avoided that by mounting the rollers off the side of the turntable rather than under the turntable.

Below is a photo of the locking pin used on the MLS turntable. Not particularly pretty, but it is functional. Our arrangement will be very similar.

Hope to see all of you this weekend – Sunday is the critical day if you can only come once – I know, it’s Mother’s Day, but a lot of mothers come to the Train Museum on Mother’s Day.


May 5, 2018

First of all, I want to thank our winter visitors who have stayed in touch with me, even after they have left town. Fred Daigneau checked in with me yesterday and wanted to say hello to everyone. He complained that his internet wasn’t working, it was cold outside, and he was ready to head back. I probably shouldn’t tell him that it’s going to be 100+ this weekend! Dave Peterson checked in via email on April 25th stating he was sorry to miss all the fun as he had to shovel snow instead! I think I join everyone in saying that we really miss these guys – hurry back both of you!

Yes, there will be a work session this Saturday morning beginning at 7:30 am. On the work agenda will be doing some final raking & shaping of the ground around the turntable to facilitate drainage if and when we get rain. We can also do the excavation in the center of the turntable in preparation of creating the footing for the center pivoting hub assembly that will support the center of the turntable.

Last weekend, we stripped the forms from the previously poured concrete ring. We had no particular problems removing the screws that held the sections of bender boards together and removal of the rebar stakes also went relatively well. Then the hard part began as there was quite a bit of dirt that had to be removed from the center of the ring. We encountered caliche again that needed to be picked out. Thank goodness for young backs who could help with that task.

We then leveled the dirt inside the ring to be about 1” below the concrete surface.

It took the better part of the morning to get the dirt raked out and there were some tired souls who will testify to the amount of work that was done.

The group was up to the task and we finished just before lunch break. Then, with the surface raked flat, we filled the center with water to “settle” the ground in preparation for the next step. It took nearly ½ hour with the hose on full to create the shallow pond you see below. It was gone within another 30 minutes.

Ultimately, we will place some ¼ minus material spread inside to keep dust down and give the space a finished appearance. Before we do that, we will need to dig the center excavation for the pivot hub assembly footing.

Below is what the turntable looked like just before we left for lunch.

Now that it’s beginning to take shape, this is proving to be a pretty exciting project to be involved in. The turntable structure is being fabricated/welded at Burt’s house on a huge welding table built by Jacob Payne. The welding table is level and is large permitting the turntable, which is 16’ long weighing nearly 200 pounds to be easier to fabricate. Below is a current picture of the system mocked up before welding begins.

The hub assembly was donated to the project by Glenn Ellis. The trailer axle was bent badly in the middle, but we were able to cut off each end to give us two hub assemblies (one to use & one spare).

The hub assembly will be attached to a steel plate welded into the center of the turntable shown below. Tonight, the center will have a 3” diameter hole drilled where the pilot hole is located to accept the end of the hub assembly. You are looking at the bottom of the turntable in all of the pictures.

In the picture below, you can see one of the notches that are cut into the pieces of channel that hold the long pieces apart maintaining the intended 7-5/8” gauge.

Not depicted are the pieces that have all been fabricated that form the pockets into which the 4 roller wheel assemblies will be mounted (two at each end on the sides of the turntable). My hope is that the entire assembly will be finished & delivered to the Museum by May 12th. Our next work session will probably be May 19th although the 12th isn’t out of the question.

Hope to see you Saturday – Remember there is no Open House this Sunday but there is going to be a General Membership Meeting this Friday. Hope to see you all this weekend.


April 28, 2018

There will be a scheduled work session this Saturday beginning at 7:30 am at the Museum. You might have been wondering if we were able to do the concrete pour last weekend. Well, we did manage to “git er done”. On the work agenda for Saturday will be stripping the forms off the concrete ring poured last Saturday. We also will lower the elevation of dirt inside the concrete ring to at least 1” below the concrete surface. To address concerns being expressed about water ponding inside the ring, if we have time, we will extend a drain from inside the ring to the adjacent drainage channel. We can also shoot some grades around the outside of the ring to determine which direction we need to divert drainage from the areas adjacent to the ring. So, it will be a full morning – please consider stopping by.

Last Saturday, although being the day before the Open House, a few hearty souls came down to help with the concrete pour into the previously formed ring. Before we got started with the pour, we had to bend & wire in all of the rebar around the ring (two #3’s w/spacers).

As usual, manning the mixing duty, with a bunch of experience, was Glenn Ellis who expertly controlled the slump with just the right amount of water. The mixer worked flawlessly again and we are grateful to Raymond McDaniel for making it available to the Museum.

Paul Kruppenbacher lent his back and arms to the effort by hand placing all of the concrete (one ton of it to be exact) bucket by bucket into the previously formed ring. Tony Kanavage kept up with Paul or vice versa, as they methodically moved around the circle making sure to pull the rebar up off the ground and into the concrete as they went. The notched screed worked out well to make sure the level of the concrete stayed no higher than the form and below the level of the bar stock. I need to try and get a more flattering view of Paul working. Sorry Paul. Will McGeary joined the fun and provided some encouragement to Tony as his work is the part that will ultimately show.

By noon, we were done and the group retired to Sam’s (our favorite watering hole) for a much needed break and refueling.

Hope to see you this Saturday at 7:30 am for another fun day as the turntable is quickly approaching reality.


April 21, 2018

Sunday is an Open House. At the moment, the predicted high temperature is looking to be over 90, thus we may not be running. That is subject to change depending on the weather and also available staffing.

There is some motivation to do the concrete pour on Saturday morning since the ring is now formed. Holding off may result in kids tripping on or messing with the forms so it makes sense to get the concrete poured ASAP.

So, at the moment, we are scheduling a work session for Saturday to do the pour. The pour will need to be preceded by placement of a pair of 3/8” rebar inside the formed the circular ring which shouldn’t take long at all. We should have the 20+ sacks of concrete at the Museum by Saturday morning for the work session. The weather is predicted to be mid 80’s so the AM should be ideal. Consequently, we are going to try to do the pour Saturday morning. I hope you can come & join us in this effort.

Last Saturday, the installation of the circular forms was done. Although the process took some time, it went rather well in my opinion. Plywood templates were used to set the width & height spacing for the bender board.

Then, using a rotary hammer drill & a long ½” masonry bit, we pre-drilled holes adjacent to the bender board to accept the ½” rebar stakes. They were hammered into the pre-drilled holes and held the board securely. The board was tied to the rebar stakes with tie wires.

 

The installation on top of the masonry retaining wall required wooden vertical pieces screwed into the block. That also worked well.

The finished results speak for themselves.

While Tony, Jacob, & Burt worked on the forms for the concrete ring, Paul Kruppenbacher, with help from Jurgen Zander, went to work on replacing several broken or split boards on the wooden bridge walkway between the tracks.

After the boards were replaced, they gave the walkway a fresh coat of stain. Looks great.

As if that wasn’t enough, with Jesse’s help, we managed to give a birthday party a train ride around the Museum. The kids always love the train rides and we make a big deal out of them for the birthday boy or girl. This is why we do what we do.

Looking forward to seeing you Saturday morning @ 7:30 am and don’t forget the Open House Sunday.


April 14, 2018

There will be a scheduled work session this Saturday at the Museum beginning at 7:30 am. On the work agenda will be setting forms for the concrete ring pour now that the steel ring has been placed. Construction of the turntable itself has begun in hopes that it will be completed when we need to get it installed. But first things first. The bender board that will be the forming material is already at the Museum awaiting it’s installation.

I can’t remember who suggested it, but drilling holes for the installation of the vertical rebar used to secure the forms is going to work out great. We tried one last Saturday just to make sure it was the right approach. One of the tasks needed will be to cut the ½” rebar into short lengths using the rebar cutter stored in the engine shed. It works well but it takes a strong set of arms and back. I figure we’ll need a rebar every couple of feet inside and outside. I think we’ll need at least 32 pieces of cut rebar (perhaps more) with each being about 16” long. It will be a full morning to get this task completed. Once the forms are set, we’ll be able to schedule the pour.


April 7, 2018

There is no scheduled work session this Saturday due to the Open House on Sunday...but come on down anyway.

Last Saturday was a regular work session back to work on the Turntable, and on the schedule was to install the steel ring to the previously prepared posts.

So 1st was the measuring and the verifying, then the work began welding the rolled ring to the posts hopefully forming some sort of circular shape.

But 1st 1st, a small extension was added to one of the more "sunken" posts. One to weld and another to hold the bar stock in just the correct position.
And worked continued around from post to post.

... to post until we got back to where we started. Then just a quick cut off the extra and we had one mostly perfect circle!

See you all this Sunday at the open house and don't forget the monthly membership meeting Friday night.


March 31, 2018

There will be a scheduled work session this Saturday beginning at a new time (7:30 am) as winter has past and spring is officially here. With Saturday’s high predicted to be near 90, we want to get a little bit of a head start. On the agenda for Saturday’s session is the installation of the 1” x ½” bar stock ring for the turntable. The ring is actually three separate pieces that were rolled to the approximate diameter (15’-4”) needed by Smyth Industries who is a major steel fabricator of water tanks in Tucson. They were kind enough to offer their assistance to us using their massive steel rollers which they use to create the curved sheet steel pieces that make up large welded steel water tanks. Before the ring can begin to be installed, we must cut off the ends of each piece as the ends won’t have the curve applied (typical for rolled steel is that the last foot and a half +/- comes out straight).

Last Saturday, although not a scheduled work session, new member Fred Daigneau, Roger Phillips, Tony Kanavage & myself got out the transit and re-established the appropriate grade and then did the math necessary to find the intended elevation for the tops of the steel supports that will hold the steel ring. What seemed like a relatively easy task proved to be anything but. Just ask Roger & Fred how their knees and backs felt after this exercise.

Although I had the easy job of looking through the transit scope, I managed to miss one of the elevations by an inch! This resulted in the one post being cut 1” too short. Like previous screw-ups one my part, we will need to impose upon our resident welder to fix my mess by welding in a 1” long filler piece.

We closed off the unscheduled work session by giving train rides to a bunch of kids who came to the Museum for a birthday party.

Hope to see you this Saturday @ 7:30 am to begin the installation work on the ring of steel.

In case you can’t make it on Saturday, I wish each and every one of you and your families a wonderful Easter Sunday.


March 24, 2018

Since we missed the work session last Saturday, we will attempt to get done what we should have done last week. So, for those of you who can join us on Saturday morning @ 8:00 am, we’ll get the steel posts cut to the correct elevation in preparation of the steel bar stock ring installation. If you can only devote one visit to the Museum this weekend, please come on Sunday for the Open House so we can have enough people to run the public train.


March 17, 2018

There is not going to be a scheduled work session this Saturday as several members are traveling to Phoenix with Burt (Dave Peterson, Jurgen Zander, Fred Daigneau, & Tony Kanavage) to attend the Spring Meet of the Maricopa Live Steamers and the “Everything Railroad” swap meet. Both events occur at the Adobe Mountain Desert Railroad Park on Saturday with the swap meet starting at 9:00 am until 1:00 pm. The flyer for the swap meet can be viewed at this link: www.azmodelrr.com/AMRS documents/Swap Meet Flyer.pdf The website for the Maricopa Live Steamers is: http://maricopalivesteamers.com . For those of you who have heard, GPD member Chris Cheely has finally taken possession of his new Dash 9 engine as pictured below. Chris will be at the MLS meet this weekend.

For those members staying in Tucson this weekend, you may want to consider coming down to the Museum if for no other purpose than to operate the train as there is a fairly large birthday party scheduled for 10:00 am on Saturday. The train could be operated for that party if enough staff are present. Remember, if the gates are closed, only an Engineer and Conductor would be needed.

Last Saturday, the steel posts were set into concrete for the support of the bar stock ring that will support the turntable. This was a relatively easy task compared to the effort to dig the holes. The next task will be to mark each post where they will then be cut to be level & the appropriate elevation.

A recently joined member to the GPD came to the work session last Saturday and we quickly put him to work. Fred Daigneau is a winter visitor from Ohio. He was an engineer on the Cuyahoga Valley Scenic Railroad (www.cvsr.com ) located in the Cuyahoga Valley National Park which is between Akron & Cleveland, Ohio. Welcome aboard Fred!

Fred also helped out during the Open House on Sunday by sharing some of the flagman duties with Dave Peterson and also helped to corral the kids at the Station. With several of our “regulars” not available on Sunday, we weren’t sure we could run but Brian Scott & his son Trevor came down and ran the train all day. We had great weather and the crowd was steady all day. Everyone seemed to have a great time and initial reports from the Gift Shop were very encouraging. Thank you Brian, Trevor, Fred & Dave for all your help.


March 10, 2018

Due to the Open House this Sunday, there will not be a scheduled work session this Saturday. As usual, there will be some of the group who will come anyway. If we have 2-3 people come, we will install the steel posts intended to support the bar stock ring for the turntable. This effort shouldn’t take long to complete and there is no digging involved (yea!!!). As usual, if you’re bored and want something to do, come on down and join in the fun. If you can only devote a single visit to the Museum this weekend, please consider coming to the Sunday Open House as we will be running thin on staff to operate the train as a couple of our regulars won’t be able to come Sunday.

Last weekend, we had the “Rails in the Garden” event visit the Museum on both Saturday & Sunday. We had a great showing on Saturday with plenty of staff to operate the train. Ron McLaughlin brought his “shorty” Santa Fe Chief with his engineer car and work caboose staffed with a couple of teddy bears from Benson. Roger Phillips brought his trailer full of Burlington Northern equipment from Casa Grande and we had three trains running on the track. The Museum’s Alco S4 with a couple of gondolas and the newly fitted-up beam car was used for passenger rides. It was a lot of fun with three trains running without having to worry about staff. With visitor’s arriving at a slower pace than a normal Open House, we were able to run the Museum train with only two staff persons. We had the drive gate closed, thus no flagman was needed and there were no lines waiting to ride the train all day, thus the station master duties were not needed. It was great weather and we were able to take lots of breaks during the day making it truly a pleasure to be there helping out. Sunday was the same – although we just had the Museum train running. John Roads and I were able to run the train all day until about 3:30 where we put it away. Thanks to those who came Saturday to help out including those who helped with the outdoor G-gauge setup. We received a lot of positive feedback.

In the morning during the work session, we were able to get the 9 holes dug for the steel posts. It was harder than anticipated due to the presence of rock in the holes. The water pic got us through the caliche without much effort, but it wouldn’t do a thing to the rock we encountered.

John, Jesse & I dug for two hours and have the sore shoulders/arms to prove it but we did get it done just as the Rails in the Garden visitors began to arrive.

For the event, Ron McLaughlin brought his Santa Fe Chief to add interest for the visitors.

Roger Phillips brought his trailer full of Burlington Northern equipment from Casa Grande.

It was a great day at the train Museum. Hope to see you this Sunday for the Open House.

PS: Don’t forget that Chairman Jesse has called a special meeting tonight beginning at 7:00 pm at the Museum. Please consider attending to add your suggestions regarding the following agenda items:

• Brainstorm how to get more help on our run days. Discuss Schedule/Signup.
• Recruitment & Train Show(s) display.
• Ongoing & future projects.
• Begin planning the Holiday Event scheduled for December 8th.
• Chairman & other committee appointments.
• Junior Engineer Program


March 3, 2018

Even though there is the Rails in the Garden Tour coming to the Museum at 10:00 am on Saturday, we will be having a scheduled work session beginning at 8:00 am. On the agenda will be the post hole digging for the vertical posts around the perimeter of the turntable ring that will support the 1” x ½” bar stock. We need 9 holes dug approximately 12” deep spaced approximately 3’ apart. Once dug, we will set 16” long, 1½” square tube posts into the holes and pour a small amount of concrete around the posts to hold them solid. Once the concrete sets, we’ll measure each with our builders level and then cut off the top of each to have all be exactly level to support the steel ring. The steel ring will be welded to the posts at a future work session. The turntable is going to be 16’ long and will ride upon the top of the bar stock which will be set 4” inside outer edge of the turntable (outer edge of the concrete ring).

But first things first, we need to get out the water pic, post hole digger, hammer drill and caliche bar and dig 9 holes. Once dug, we can mix up concrete and set the steel posts.

Last weekend, we took a welcome respite from the routine. The previous Saturday, with cool temperatures and overcast skies, the group got busy establishing the finished grade for the concrete ring. A little bit of digging was needed and the mound of dirt in the center had to be leveled by backfilling against the recently constructed retaining wall. We had a good turnout and the work went relatively fast as we completed the intended tasks. Below, Burt, Dave, Jesse & Tony are hard at work getting the grade established for the concrete ring. Roger was behind the camera.

The white lines in the picture below approximate where the post holes will be dug. Jesse, Dave, Tony, Michael and Roger admire their work.

Hope to see you all this Saturday. If you can, plan on staying for the Rails in the Garden Tour.

Every once in a while, I’ll pull out some old photos and we’ll reminisce a bit. I think it’s important as we continue to move forward to reflect on where we’ve been. ENJOY.

FLASH BACKS:
• November 2008 – Formal creation of the 7-1/2” gauge committee approved by the Museum BOD. A year of planning begins.

January 2009 - In the beginning, erosion & weeds were the norm.

October 2010 – In the picture below, Glenn Ellis, using his Bobcat, moved all of the cut soil from the front of the Museum to the rear to provide a stable & level roadbed for the railroad. Notwithstanding, notice the 2” diameter pipes driven into the ground about 4’ apart that hold restrain the pieces of rail that hold back the imported soil. Those pipes are 2’ long and had to be driven into the ground through caliche and rock. Raymond & Burt hammered on one for about 20 minutes but couldn’t get it driven completely. That’s when Dale Cover suggested that we use his “water pic” which was nothing but a piece of ½” pipe with a valve and hose connection on it. Of all the ideas brought forward during construction of this railroad, the water pic falls at the top of the list for saving time, not to mention our backs. The water pic enabled all of the 30+/- pipes to easily be driven into the ground in about 2 hours. Thank you Glenn Ellis and Dale Cover for your invaluable contributions to the Museum.

March 2011 – Bob Rubino and Hugh Madsen took on the project to create the rock retaining wall out front using rock excavated from the home of Glenn Ellis.

Magnificent would be an understatement describing their work as the wall has withstood the test of time without any failings whatsoever. Thank you to both Hugh & Bob for their contribution.


February 24, 2018

There will not be a scheduled work session held this Saturday. Work on the turntable will pause until the following Saturday’s work session. An email will be sent out next week explaining what the next steps are for the turntable. If you want to come down on Saturday, you’re certainly welcome to do so as there is a birthday party scheduled on the calendar so it would be nice to be able to give the kids a ride.

Last Saturday, Roger Phillips brought back the straddle beam car with the mounting pieces for the trucks installed including coupler pockets and couplers temporarily on loan. We quickly installed the pair of Tom Bee trucks that we had on hand and put the car on the tracks. For those of you who might remember, Saturday morning looked and felt like a drizzly day in San Francisco.

Not deterred, we got the beam car on the track and hooked it up to the Museum’s Alco S4. With headlights on, we then took it for a short trip up & down the foggy tracks.

This homemade beam car was built a couple of years ago by Dale Cover in his garage using donated lumber. It was painted at the Museum and the seat upholstery was added by Roger Phillips. Although it has some warping issues, it will give us a good opportunity to test the concept with passengers before investing a bunch of money in commercially available steel units of similar design. Planned improvements include edging along the sides of the footrest board to prevent a person’s foot from accidently sliding off the car.

We may consider building a beam car utilizing a welded steel frame similar to that depicted in the photos below. Steel will reduce the likelihood of warpage although care during the welding process to keep the steel straight & plumb will be critical. We’ll see how the wood beam car works out before we go down this road. The photo below is a beam car currently marketed for $395 on the website www.discoverlivesteam.com. They are being built in Florida so shipping could add dramatically to that cost.

Another example of a beam car frame being marketed on the same website is depicted below (photo shows three separate frames stacked on top of each other). The frames are priced at $295 each. They are also located in Florida.

Now to the important stuff: This Sunday is Open House. We will be somewhat short staffed as yours truly will be out of town. If you can attend the Open House to help with running the train, please let Chairman Jesse know so that plans can be made. Jesse’s email is theshape@gmail.com . The weather for Sunday will be sunny and cool. Should be fine for running the train if there is enough staff.


February 17, 2018

Yes, it’s late notice, but the weather has been pretty wild the last few days. Working outside in the dirt/mud wouldn’t have worked out so I had to wait to make sure that Saturday would be dry. The forecast says 70’ish and we shouldn’t have any rain overnight so it should be dried out. Therefore, there is a scheduled work session to begin at 8:00 am.

On the work agenda will be backfilling against the newly laid up retaining wall. This accomplishes two things; 1) it gives us a level place to work and, 2) it lowers the pile of dirt to enable us to get the grades established for the concrete ring.

Once the dirt pile is lowered, we can then establish the exact location and grade for the placement of the concrete ring that will support the ends of the turntable. If we finish that task, we can then determine where the vertical supports for the circular bar stock will be installed and perhaps begin digging the holes needed to install them.

Last weekend, although not a scheduled work session, we did get the last course of block installed on the stem wall as well as placement of rebar to secure the concrete ring to the stem wall when it is poured.

Tony Kanavage was kind enough to do the block installation which was checked and found to be nearly perfect in terms of being level. Great job Tony!

The turntable is slowly becoming a reality so it’s not too soon to start thinking about how to safely use it. Our engines may not weigh as much as a real one, but 600 pounds ain’t exactly light. As much as we try to make the track dead level in and out of the turntable, there will be a slight grade between the turn table and the engine house. Unattended equipment could roll into the turntable.

So, easily placed and visually obvious wheel chocks will need to be created and used or ???

During a Wednesday night work session at the Museum, we decided to get the train out and do some “night-running” to see how well the GPD’s Alco S4 headlight would illuminate the track as we are probably going to be giving night time rides during the Holiday Event scheduled at the end of the year themed around the Polar Express movie. Below is a photo taken during that test behind the caboose.

Night time running is a very different experience. I encourage you to try it. Think about how this will look with Christmas lights and decorations along the route. It’s going to be fun!    Hope to see you tomorrow morning.


February 10, 2018

There will not be a “scheduled” work session Saturday due to the Open House Sunday. However, rumor has it that the completion of the concrete block stem wall for the turntable will occur Saturday so if you are looking for something fun to do, you are certainly welcome to come down @ 8:00 am and join this jolly group of masons while they work their magic. As usual, on Open House weekends, if your schedule only permits one visit to the Museum, please choose Sunday as we’ve been having a lot of difficulty getting enough help to run the train during Open House.

Last Saturday, Glenn Ellis & Tony Kanavage took on the placement of the first two courses of 8” x 8” x 16” concrete blocks.

Like any project, sometimes the hardest part is just getting started. With the weather cooperating, and with John Roads, Jesse Miller, Paul Kruppenbacher feeding Glenn & Tony mortar on demand, they dynamic duo made good headway. Laying block isn’t the easiest task on the planet, and laying block in a curved pattern on a sloped embankment with uneven surfaces doesn’t make it any easier. On top of that, QC inspection from Burt Wright, who was relegated to “gofer” as he was recovering from flu, slowed progress to a crawl, but even with the problems, the group managed to get two of the three courses laid and it looks pretty darn good.

Only one more course of 4” x 8” x 16” remain and then the grouting.

Hope to see you this weekend – especially on Sunday!


February 3, 2018

Wow, what incredible weather!

Sorry for the late notice but Saturday, beginning at 8:00 am, we plan on moving into the 3rd phase of building the turntable. That will be the laying up of concrete block to create the stem/retaining wall for that portion of the turntable that extends slightly into the drainage swale. Depending on the number of individuals who come, we may also address a couple of track conditions identified during Sunday’s Open House.

Last Saturday, a few brave souls showed up to complete phase 2 of the turntable project which was the mixing and placing of a concrete foundation into the excavation (Phase 1) created a couple of months ago for the turntable. We quickly re-established the elevation needed for the top of the footing and set some rebar stakes to help us establish where the top of the concrete needed to be. Then, we strategically placed the cement mixer (obtained from Raymond McDaniel) at the edge of the excavation. This allowed us to mix & dump the concrete directly into the trench eliminating the need to wheel concrete to the trench. To prevent dirt from falling into the concrete during the pour, a trough was formed using plywood and roofing felt. By the way, thank you to Raymond McDaniel for putting wheels on that mixer!

4 volunteers then mixed up the twenty, 80 pound sacks of concrete and managed to get 98% of it into the location where it belonged. Glenn Ellis ran the mixer and created a consistent mix each time allowing it to easily pour down the embankment into the trench. It only took about 2 hours, and the result was great.

With Glenn in charge of making the mix, Dave Pederson and Jurgen Zander worked the trench below pulling the concrete as needed to each end of the excavation.

Once poured, equipment was cleaned & put away and we retired to our favorite watering hole to listen to Burt complain about having to lift 1,600 pounds of concrete twice.

We have now completed Phase Two of the project. Phase 3, which is the laying of 3 courses of cinder block (2 courses using 8”x8”x16” blocks and 1 course using 4”x8”x16”) on top of the foundation, will begin this Saturday. If any of you have experience laying concrete block, it would be great to have your help. It’s not that many block – less than 35 total.

Below are a couple of snipped images from our design drawing:

 

As a look ahead, once Phase 3 is completed. Note that the phases indicated below are intended to represent approximately 1 work session at the Museum. Some may get combined and others may be split into multiple sessions depending upon the amount of help we get.
• Phase 4: excavation & grading at the surface creating a level area for the 360 degree 8” x 4” concrete grade ring.

  • Phase 5: form & steel setting for the grade ring.

  • Phase 6: mix & pour the concrete grade ring.

  • Phase 7: form, steel setting, and concrete pour for the center hub assembly.

  • Phase 8: build and place the turntable.

  • Phase 9: form & pour the curbing required for installation of the approach tracks into the turntable.

  • Phase 10: grade the ground from the existing track to the turntable and from the turntable to the engine house.

  • Phase 11: Install track connecting the existing track to the turntable and from the turntable to the engine house.


Hope to see you all this Saturday at 8:00 am.


Large Scale Railroad - 2017
Large Scale Railroad - 2015-2016
Large Scale Railroad 2014 (July-Dec)
Large Scale Railroad 2014 (Jan-June)
Large Scale Railroad - 2013
Large Scale Railroad 2012 (July - Dec)
Large Scale Railroad 2012 (Jan-June)
Large Scale Railroad 2011

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MUSEUM ADDRESS: 3975 N. MILLER AVE., TUCSON, AZ 85705-2275
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[Page Published May 17, 2018 ]

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